COURSE OFFERINGS

Summer 2022 Semester
Online: May 16 – August 13
Onsite: June 27 – August 5

Asynchronous Online Graduate Courses
May 16 – August 13

Asynchronous Courses are classes that have been recorded in previous semesters. Asynchronous classes enable students to move through at their own pace.

THEO 590/Introduction to Theology
This introduction to the graduate-level study of theology treats comprehensively the meaning of theology, its various disciplines, major methods and basic terminology.  Areas of focus are Divine Revelation and the characteristics of the human response, relationships between faith and reason, Scripture and Tradition, doctrine and its development, and the roles of the Magisterium and the theologian in the Church.  Special attention is also given to the history of theology, with particular emphasis on the patristic, medieval, and post-Vatican II periods.  Prerequisite for all M.A. and Diploma students unless exempt because of prior theological study. The credits for this 500-level course do not count toward the graduate-level theology credits required for the MA degree. 
Students entering the MA or diploma program without sufficient previous coursework in theology must successfully complete THEO 590. A student may request that the Registrar record his or her grade for this course as a pass/fail instead of a letter grade, which is included in the student’s GPA.

LATN 501/Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin
An introduction to the Latin language by which students may begin to develop reading competency in Latin. The course covers resources and techniques for effective learning of Latin, the Latin case system, the five main cases of the first three declensions, all six verb tenses in the active and passive voices of the indicative mood, and complex sentences and subordination, and several Latin prayers. This course may be taken on a pass/fail basis and does not count toward the graduate-level theology credits required for the MA degree. The course may be taken for undergraduate credit.

EDUC 602/The Catechetical Tradition
The theology and history of evangelization and catechesis; the methods, models and experiences of evangelization and catechesis from Biblical times throughout the history of the Church; the teachings and normative directives of the Church on evangelization and catechesis.

HIST 611/History of the Church, Part II
A survey of the history of the Church from the High Middle Ages to the present time, with special emphasis on theological issues and the contributions of the Church to culture and civilization.   Includes the Renaissance, Reformation, the Catholic Counter-reformation, the evangelization of the New World, the scientific revolution and Enlightenment, up to the Second Vatican Council.

PHIL 603/Philosophical Errors
A study of some of the false philosophies of man and God, especially in so far as these form the intellectual basis for the errors and shortcomings in contemporary popular thought and in Biblical exegesis, with a critique of these theories and a comparison of them with the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas. 

SCRI 701/The Prophets
A study of the history of prophecy in Israel: the prophets, their role in the development of salvation history, and their biblical theology. An emphasis is given to the prophet’s role in calling the Israelites to covenant fidelity, purity of worship of Yahweh, and authentic liturgical celebration.

SCRI 702/The Psalms and Wisdom Literature
An examination of the Psalms and Wisdom literature (Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Wisdom of Solomon, and Sirach) of ancient Israel and the historical period in which they developed.  Special attention is given to the liturgical and catechetical uses of the Psalms and Proverbs in the Early Church, the problem of evil in the book of Job, and the historical period as described in the books of Joshua through 1 Kings.

THEO 602/Christology
An introduction to the mystery of the Incarnation, from the perspectives of Scripture, patristic theology and St. Thomas Aquinas. Course includes the nature and method of Christology, the ‘quests’ for the historical Jesus, foreshadowings of the Incarnation and Jesus in the Old Testament, the patristic development of Christology, the motive for the Incarnation, the personal union of Christ’s divine and human natures, the human nature assumed by the Word, the theological implications of the union of natures, the Paschal Mystery and our redemption. This course combines historical and systematic methods in an engagement with Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae III.

THEO 802/Catholic Social Teachings
This course examines the role of the Church in society and focuses on the major papal and conciliar documents since Pope Leo XIII.  Special attention is given to teachings about the family, the political and economic spheres of society, the international community, and the Holy See’s unique contributions on the world stage.  The sacredness of life, the dignity of man, his creation in the image of God, and his personhood are emphasized as foundational to social morality.

Onsite Graduate Classes
June 27 – August 5

In-person summer courses are hosted at Christendom College’s beautiful campus in Front Royal, Virginia.  Students attending any of these courses may reside on campus for the duration of this accelerated six-week semester.  Unlike Fall and Spring courses, onsite Summer courses are not live-streamed or recorded.

SCRI 607/New Testament
Mondays, Tuesdays: 8:45 am – 11:15 am ET | Dr. Andrew Montanaro
A survey of the books of the New Testament as the fulfillment of the old covenant epoch, including the Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline corpus, the Catholic epistles, and the Apocalypse of St. John. 3 credits.

THEO 721/The Virtues
Mondays, Tuesdays: 1:00 – 3:30 pm ET | Dr. Andrew Whitmore
A study of the nature of virtue and the types of virtue continuing with a focus on the particular virtues, specifically, the four cardinal virtues with their related virtues, and the three theological virtues. The course is based on the Summa Theologiae II of St. Thomas Aquinas and involves close examination and discussion of the texts. The aim of the course is to revive an authentically Thomistic ethics based on the human person.  3 credits.

THEO 604/ Moral Theology
Wednesdays, Thursdays: 8:45 am – 11:15 am ET | Dr. Joseph Arias
A study of the fundamental principles of moral theology in light of the revelation of God’s law and the grace of Christ, including the nature and end of morality, the vocation to beatitude, freedom and the morality of human acts, moral conscience, infused habits, the nature of sin, the commandments and the natural law, the question of moral absolutes, and an examination of some contemporary trends in moral theology. 3 credits.

THEO 605/Liturgy and Sacraments
Wednesdays, Thursdays: 1 – 3:30 pm ET| Dr. Joseph Arias
This course is devoted to a study of the liturgical and sacramental life of the Church encompassing the historical, theological and canonical developments of the sacraments, and situating them in their relation to the entirety of the liturgy as a celebration of Christ and his Church. 3 credits.

Catholicism and Modernity: Magisterial Readings from Vatican I to John Paul II
Thursdays  6:30-9:00 pm, Fridays 1:00 -3:30 pm ET | Dr. RJ Matava
How did we get to where we are, and what does that mean for where to go from here? In this seminar, gain a big-picture theological perspective as we explore the deep origins of modernity, the difference between modernity and modernism, doctrinal development, and the particular challenges for Catholic faith that have arisen over the course of Christianity’s second millennium. Immerse yourself in the vast and rich array of magisterial teaching from the last 150 years on divine revelation and the Church, and how these teachings bear upon such topics as marriage, the social order, technology, and the moral life.   3 credits.

LATN 501/2-IN: Intensive Classical Latin
Mondays through Fridays 8:45 am – 11:15 am ET | Dr. Anthony McDonald
(6 credits)
An intensive course that meets daily and requires a minimum of an additional four to five hours of daily study outside class. This course initiates the student in the morphology, syntax, grammar, and vocabulary of Latin; one who successfully follows this course will achieve Latin reading fluency with the assistance of a lexicon. This course covers in one semester the full scope of an elementary series of Latin courses. This course may be taken on a pass/fail basis and does not count as graduate credit toward the MA degree, and satisfies the language requirement of the Systematic and Moral Theology concentrations.

N.B. This course prepares one to read Classical Latin; hence, the successful student will have the key to the widest reading of Latin literature, both Classical and classicizing, and, with suitable initiation and reference material, non-classicizing material, whether Patristic, Biblical, medieval, or neo-Latin.

GREK 501/2-IN: Intensive Classical Greek
Mondays through Fridays 1 pm – 3:30 pm ET | Dr. Edward Strickland
(6 credits)
An intensive course that meets daily and requires a minimum of an additional four to five hours of daily study outside class. This course initiates the student in the morphology, syntax, grammar, and vocabulary of Greek; one who successfully follows this course will achieve Greek reading fluency with the assistance of a lexicon. This course covers in one semester the full scope of an elementary series of Greek courses. This course may be taken on a pass/fail basis and does not count as graduate credit toward the MA degree, and satisfies the language requirement of the Sacred Scripture concentration.

N.B. This course prepares one to read Classical Greek; hence, the successful student will have the key to the widest reading of Greek literature, both Classical and classicizing, and, with suitable initiation and reference material, non-classicizing material, whether Hellenistic, Patristic, Biblical, or late antique. 

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